‘Helen Yemm hunts down a watering can with a water release button, putting an end to wastage.

I have newly planted shrubs and clematis at the back of my borders and I’ll need to carry on watering them with a watering can. My soil is clay and I try to avoid walking on it for fear of over-compacting it. I wonder if you or any of your readers had clever ideas as to how to extend the reach of my can spout in order to avoid wasting water by splattering it everywhere in my attempts to reach the plants that need it most.
Mrs Mahruk Bailey, via email

What a timely gift to me your email was, Mrs Bailey. It came hot on the heels of one from frustrated fellow reader Colin Tait, who wants to arm himself (and his friends) for the summer of drought with more push-button NuCans. So far he has failed to find any in the garden centres or DIY stores near him, and furthermore failed in his attempts to make direct contact with the little Isle of Wight company that designed and marketed them.
Colin’s email alarmed me somewhat. I have long been a fan of the seven-litre outdoor NuCan (there is a smaller one for indoor plants as well). What it lacks in “traditional” good looks, it makes up for with sheer niftiness and ease of use. It is a slim, light, plastic watering can with two interchangeable spouts, one short for close watering and one long.

Indeed, I imagine that with a bit of extra plastic pipe of the right size, even the long spout could be extended further if really required. The NuCan’s unique selling point, however, is an ingenious water-release button in the handle that you operate with your thumb. Coupled with the can’s light weight, this enables you to reach out and target your water exactly where you want it. No splattering or waste of the precious stuff. Just what the doctor ordered, as the expression goes, Mrs Bailey.

Any cynics (there are some, and they love emailing) who think I should not use my space to bang the drum quite so enthusiastically about goods and services I really like, particularly those that are new or struggling in these difficult times, should ask themselves this: if hands-on gardeners like me don’t do it on pages like this, who will, and where?’

Source:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/drought/9228640/Thorny-problems-the-best-watering-can-for-the-drought.html

published 26 April 2012

Related links:

Thorny problems: the best watering can for the drought

Helen Yemm

Related products:

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news, updates and special offers from Miracle Watering Cans.

You have Successfully Subscribed!